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If you were a pagan in Rome or a Greek city of the Roman Empire in the second part of the fourth century CE, times were tough: Christians, or at least people who were attracted by the ideas of Christianity, were taking over: temples were being converted to churches, statues of the gods were coming down left and right, animal sacrifices—by Zeus!—were being outlawed in some cases. People were running around preaching about Jesus—who seems like no more than a magus or a seer!—and about mercy and redemption and salvation and “God’s love” and all sorts of other ideas that sounded downright mad!
For this SWA, please make sure first to read the texts in Warrior’s Roman Religion sourcebook, pp. 173-186, with care; therein are texts dealing with the slow but steady rise of Christianity in Rome and its Empire. Take extra time to read the remarkable excerpt from a letter to the Christian-leaning Emperor Valentinian II written by Symmachus, an old-school Roman pagan, who makes a case for continued viability of Roman state religion in the era of Christianity, and asks that the religious practices and beliefs of pagans like himself be tolerated (15.27).
Taking a cue from Symmachus (but please feel no need to imitate his style or the contents of his request), pretend you are an old-school, traditionalist pagan in Greece or Rome. Write to a Christian—either a friend or some authority figure in your community—arguing why you think the old-time religion—the polytheistic religion of cults and the traditional modes of cultic worship (sacrifice, festivals, offerings etc.)—is just as good, if not better than this new-fangled cult of Christianity, and why your city should continue to honor its practice.
There’s lots of room here for creativity and possibility. Make a compelling case for Greek polis religion or Roman state religion! If your Christian letter recipient finds your case especially compelling, he or she might decide—who knows?—to pay a visit to the old, neglected sanctuaries of Zeus or Apollo or Aphrodite, and offer up a sacrifice or two.

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